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  • Back to work: a guide to opening up your business after lockdown

    actory workers with face mask protect from outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 or COVID-19. Concept of protective action and quarantine to stop spreading of Coronavirus Disease 2019 or COVID-19.

    It’s official, those who cannot work from home are being actively encouraged to go back into the workplace. This includes many in the manufacturing, construction and food industries.  Here is our guide to ensuring staff and visitors are safe and social distancing is implemented as the nation begins to return to work.

    A general guide to good practice when encouraging employees to return to work:

    • Ensure employees who are in a vulnerable group (including those aged 70 and over, those with specific chronic pre-existing conditions and pregnant women) are strongly advised to follow social distancing guidance
    • Ensure employees who are in an extremely vulnerable group and should be shielded are supported to stay at home
    • Make sure everyone’s contact numbers and emergency contact details are up to date
    • Make sure managers can spot symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) and are clear on relevant processes, including sickness reporting and sick pay.
    • Ensure there are plenty of handwashing facilities. Soap and water are best, but hand sanitiser as a secondary option where necessary. Tissues should also be provided and staff informed of and encouraged to follow good hygiene practices.
    • Have a clear written policy and keep all staff up to date about what you are doing to reduce risks of exposure to coronavirus (COVID-19) in the workplace.
    What exactly are the social distancing requirements that the government is recommending?

    The key guidance on social distancing is that employers who have people in their offices or on-site should ensure that employees are able, where possible, to maintain a 2-metre distance from others and that they should be able and encouraged to frequently wash their hands with soap and water ideally, for at least 20 seconds.

    To facilitate this and ensure staff safety the additional points should be considered.

    • If employees can work from home they should be encouraged to do so. It means greater safety and fewer people on site making it easier for those who do need to come in to maintain social distancing. There are some helpful tools to help you manage tasks and productivity of teams remotely and these include:For communication: Zoom.us (now updated to address reported privacy issues) and Google Hangouts for online meetings.For project/task management: Asana, Monday, Trello and Slack are all popular and well-used systems to assign tasks, share files and manage workflows and deadlines.
    • Members of staff who are vulnerable or extremely vulnerable, as well as individuals whom they live with, should be supported as they follow the recommendations set out in the guidance on social distancing and shielding respectively

     

    Signage to promote social distancing due to coronavirus

     

    It may be helpful to have floor stickers and signage to help you maintain the 2 metre distance between anyone on the premises. We have items like this in stock, please email us at sales@cisafety.com or call us on 01726 74264 for more information.

    Click here to see some posters

    What if we cannot maintain a 2-metre distance between employees easily?

    There will inevitably be some activities where it is almost impossible for staff or visitors to maintain the social distancing guidelines. If this is the case, government guidance is to carefully consider whether this particular activity needs to continue for the business to operate. If it does need to take place, then the guidance is that employers should take all the mitigating actions possible to reduce the risk of transmission of COVD-19.

    Staff should be advised to keep 2 metres apart as much as possible, but where this is not easy to maintain, you should advise staff to wash their hands frequently, and especially at key points including arrival at work or home, before and after eating or taking a break. Before and after operating machinery or equipment and after sneezing, coughing or blowing their nose.

    To help with this, you should consider adding additional pop-up handwashing stations or facilities, providing soap, water and/or hand sanitiser.

    When entering and leaving, you should ensure your workforce stays 2 metres apart as much as possible. To protect your staff, you should remind colleagues daily to only come into work if they are well and no one in their household is self-isolating.

    Many businesses will need to provide more handwashing and hygiene facilities.

    These products may be helpful:

    Refillable liquid soap dispenserFloor mount for soap dispenser

    Wall mounted dispensers for alcohol gel or soap. These dispensers can also be mounted on floorstands.

    This sneeze stand is helpful for anyone who coughs or sneezes or needs to wash their hands after touching a key touch point such as a door handle.

     

    Sneeze station Sneeze Station. Contains 2 x 236ml sanitizing hand gel; 3 x boxes of 80 tissues; one label to seal prior to disposal.

     

    Please email us at sales@cisafety.com or call us on 01726 74264 for more information about these products.

    For manufacturing and processing businesses...

    If essential activities mean that staff cannot easily maintain a 2-metre distance between each other, staff should work side by side or facing away from each other rather than face-to-face if possible.

    Cleaning procedures should be scheduled regularly and more frequently throughout the day, even if this means, pausing production to allow staff to wipe down workstations with disinfectant.

    Staff should be assigned to shift teams which remain the same to limit social interaction.

    Break times should be staggered and staff encouraged to take breaks separately from each other rather than gathering. Staff should be encouraged to wash their hands before and after each break.

    You should also put up signage and floor markings in storage and warehouse areas, encouraging a 2-metre distance from colleagues where it is at all feasible.

    Click here for detailed guidance on food processing.

    For the construction industry...

    Staff should be advised to keep 2 metres apart as much as possible, but where this is not easy to maintain, you should advise staff to wash their hands frequently, and especially at key points including arrival at work or home, before and after eating or operating machinery and after sneezing, coughing or blowing their nose.

    Employees should keep the windows of enclosed machinery or enclosed spaces open for ventilation and the inside of cabs should be cleaned between use by different operators.

    The site and workflow should be planned to minimise contact between workers and avoid skin-to-skin and face-to-face contact. Where face-to-face contact is essential, this should be kept to 15 minutes or less wherever possible.

    Staff should use stairs in preference to lifts or hoists. Where lifts or hoists must be used, you should lower their capacity to reduce congestion and contact at all times, and regularly clean touchpoints, such as doors and buttons.

    Where facilities to wash hands are not available, hand sanitizers should be used.

    More examples for employers are set out in these illustrative industry examples

     

    What if we want someone to come back to work but they ask to stay at home?

    Government guidance currently is that employers in businesses which are legally allowed to open should actively encourage those who cannot fulfil their roles from home to return to the workplace.

    For those staff who ask if they can stay at home, even though they cannot fulfil their role at home, the guidance is that employers should use their discretion and respect the medical need to self-isolate in making decisions about sick pay.

    Sick pay must be paid to those who have symptoms of COVID-19 or who are living with someone who has those symptoms. SSP is also available to those who are staying at home because they’re at high risk of severe illness from coronavirus (shielding).

    Guidance about those who live with someone vulnerable who needs to be shielded is simply that they should be supported as they follow the guidance on social distancing and shielding respectively.

    If evidence is required by an employer, those with symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) can get an isolation note from NHS 111 online, and those who live with someone that has symptoms can get a note from the NHS website.

    Employees are also entitled to time off work to help someone who depends on them (a ‘dependant’) in an unexpected event or emergency. This would apply to situations related to coronavirus (COVID-19) including the need to look after dependants, including children who need to be looked after because their school has closed.

    There’s no statutory right to pay for this time off, but some employers might offer pay depending on the contract or workplace policy.

    ACAS have more information online.

    Click on the links below for more official guidance and information:

    Government guidance to businesses about COVID-19

    HSE guidance on social distancing 

    If you would like up to date information about more products which can help you to open your business safely, we are sending out e-shots on the following ranges.

    • Equip your staff: Hi-vis waistcoats, masks, face shields and other PPE
    • Keep it clean: Wipes, spray, gel and soaps and hygiene products

    Click here to sign up for updates on these products and future news and guides from us here at CIS Safety. You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the unsubscribe button on our emails.

    As always our team are here to help you. Please do keep in touch with us and we’ll work with you to support you at this difficult time. Email us at sales@cisafety.com or call 01726 74264.
  • A guide to safety precautions for those working in the food production industry

    food-factories-905513_1920 With the current COVD-19 pandemic, it is vital to protect food workers from exposure to the virus and to strengthen food hygiene and sanitation practices. This guide suggests measures to help ensure that the integrity of the food chain is maintained and that adequate and safe food supplies are available for consumers.

    Can COVID-19 be transmitted via food? According to the World Health Organisation, it is highly unlikely that people can contract COVID-19 from food or food packaging. COVID-19 is a respiratory illness and the primary transmission route is through person-to-person contact and direct contact with respiratory droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Coronaviruses cannot multiply in food.

    What surfaces can COVD-19 survive on? If respiratory droplets are too heavy to be airborne, they land on objects and surfaces surrounding an infected person. It is, therefore, possible that someone may become infected by touching a contaminated surface or object and then touching their own mouth, nose, or eyes. Recent research evaluated the survival of the COVID-19 virus on different surfaces.

    • Plastic and stainless steel: Up to 72 hours
    • Copper: Up to four hours
    • Cardboard: Up to 24 hours

    Please note, these are rough estimations which can vary according to temperature, humidity etc.

    Practical steps that food industry employers can take:

    • Reinforce personal hygiene measures
    • Provide refresher training on food hygiene principles to eliminate or reduce the risk of food surfaces and food packaging materials becoming contaminated with the virus from food workers.
    • Promote and facilitate stringent hygiene and sanitation measures such as effective handwashing and sanitation at each stage of food processing, manufacture and marketing.

    Good staff hygienic practices include:

    ● thorough hand washing – washing with soap and water for at least 20 seconds

    ● frequent use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers (not a replacement for handwashing).

    ● good respiratory hygiene (cover mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing; use tissues which are disposed of and wash hands);

    ● frequent disinfection of work surfaces and commonly touched objects such as door handles;

    • Supply, personal protective equipment (PPE) where appropriate. Masks and gloves can be effective in reducing the spread of viruses and disease within the food industry, but only if used properly.In fact, hand washing is a better way to prevent infection than wearing disposable gloves. The COVID-19 virus can contaminate disposable gloves in the same way it gets onto workers’ hands. Removal of disposable gloves can lead to contamination of hands. Wearing disposable gloves can give a false sense of security and may result in staff not washing hands as frequently as required. Handwashing is a greater protective barrier to infection than wearing disposable gloves. Hands must be washed before and after changing gloves, and gloves should be changed following any tasks which involve touching potentially contaminated items such as door handles or bins. Anyone wearing gloves needs to avoid touching their mouth and eyes.
    • Physical distancing Current UK guidelines are to introduce physical distancing of at least two metres between each person. WHO guidance is to ensure at least one metre, particularly if staff are using PPE such as masks to prevent transmission of COVD-19. Drivers need to be aware of physical distancing when picking up or dropping off deliveries. As well as maintaining physical distance from other individuals, they need to maintain a high degree of personal cleanliness and to wear clean protective clothing. It is also vital to ensure that all transport containers are kept clean and frequently disinfected, foods must be protected from contamination, and must be separated from other goods that may cause contamination.
    • Advice to customers. Consumers should always be advised to wash fruit and vegetables with potable water before consumption or use in processing derivative food products. All customers and staff should strictly observe good personal hygiene practices at all times around open food areas.

    Click here to find full guidance from the World Health Organisation

    Click here for guidance for food businesses from the UK government here:

    As always our team are here to help you. Please do keep in touch with us and we’ll work with you to support you at this difficult time. Email us at sales@cisafety.com or call 01726 74264.

  • How to make PPE last as long as possible

    PPE

     

    The shortage of PPE at present is of huge concern. While every effort is being made to supply what is needed, it is also vital to ensure that what supplies are available last as long as possible, obviously with safety as the key priority.

    The following items are in short supply and likely to be so for months to come:

    • Disposable gloves
    • Disposable aprons, sleeves, ‘paper’ suits etc.
    • Any masks, mostly FFP2 and FFP3 rated
    • Face shields / visors and safety glasses
    • Sanitizers
    • Paper towels and toilet rolls

     

    The Government has updated PPE guidance following the COVID-19 pandemic, in particular for workers in the health and care sectors. Click here to see the updates as of April 2020. This guidance relates to the use of both disposable and reusable PPE.

    Here are some suggestions for ways to make reusable PPE last for as long as possible.

     

    Non-disposable items: laundering and cleaning

    Before washing garments, close all fastenings such as zips or buttons, check pockets and turn items inside out.

    Before cleaning PPE always check the care label and / or the manufacturer’s instructions. Choosing a suitable cleaning agent is a crucial element of effective workwear and PPE care and maintenance. Non-biological detergent is best for waterproof and breathable fabric, for example. Rubber gloves should be cleaned with mild soap or bleach-free detergent and tepid water and thoroughly rinsed to remove all traces of soap or detergent residue

    Also check the advisable highest temperature and drying instructions. While UV rays can help to break down COVD-19, for example, it can also damage the effectiveness of PPE materials so a warm, dry area may be preferable to leaving items to dry in the sun once they have been thoroughly cleaned.

    Storage

    Storing is an important part of PPE care and a well thought out storage system can also. Correct storage of PPE reduces the likelihood of contamination and damage from harmful substances, high humidity, heat and light as well as helping you to manage stock levels.

    • Set clear expectations for PPE users on what they need to use, how to access it and how to store it. Provide written guidelines on proper storage procedures.
    • Ensure employees have clear, updated training on the use of PPE and are aware of a clear process to report any loss or destruction or any fault in PPE items.
    • Have a named person responsible for storage and managing stock levels of PPE.
    • Mark PPE storage areas clearly.
    • For PPE left at work after use each day, allocate storage space for employees to return their clothing and equipment. This will make inspections easier and reduce the possibility of losses.
    • Store items in a dry, clean area with enough space to clearly label and easily retrieve individual items.
    • Avoid keeping PPE near chemicals, oil or other hazardous substances.

    You can find more up to date guidance on PPE at the HSE website here: www.hse.gov.uk/toolbox/ppe.htm

     

    As always our team are here to help you. Please do keep in touch with us and we’ll work with you to support you at this difficult time. Email us at sales@cisafety.com or call 01726 74264.

     

     

     

  • Coronavirus update: We are still here to help

    wash-hands-4906750_1920

     

    The UK Government have confirmed that those involved in the production and distribution of PPE & hygiene products are classified as key workers and deemed as essential services, and therefore should remain open.

     

    This means we will continue to supply these products, which can help in the fight against the coronavirus, and confirm that orders will continue to be delivered to your premises.

     

    Orders will be confirmed when placed and also before any dispatch is made, to ensure we are not attempting delivery to a business that is currently closed.

     

    We are advising, however that supply of many products including face masks, disposable gloves, sanitisers and paper products are under extreme pressure and we are experiencing sustained delays as vital supplies are diverted to the NHS.

     

    If you are still operating, please prepare carefully, plan wisely and work with us as we do all we can to support those that need continued supply of these products. We are confident that the situation will be managed in time and we will win as the world responds to what is being asked of it.

     

    Whilst we are open for business, we are taking the following actions to guard against the spread of this terrible disease and protect both yourself and our staff:-

     

    • Staff are mostly working remotely, with the exception of a skeleton warehouse staff and operations.
    • Our trade counter is closed to collections, we are undertaking to deliver all orders during this crisis. Signatures will not be required however we have tracking and the driver will take a photograph of the goods at point of delivery.
    • The staff that are at work are segregated and work separately.
    • We have increased cleaning and disinfection routines.

     

    So what does this mean for you? The sales team is still available to take calls, video conference and email, and so if you have any queries or requests for information please do not hesitate to get in touch using the normal contact details.

     

    Tel: 01726 74264

    Email: sales@cisafety.com

     

    We would like to thank our customers for their patience if deliveries have been affected during this unprecedented outbreak.

     

    We will continue to do all we can so that we can maintain this vital supply to the frontline services that are in greatest need. There is good news emerging around the world, so keep positive and by working together we will come through!

    Thank you and stay safe.

  • Simple ways to help your staff avoid coronavirus

    human-hand-under-pouring-water

     

    As with any situation, clear, helpful and accurate information is always useful. Here we offer some simply guidance to help you minimise risk to your staff and visitors of coronavirus infections, or indeed any other viral infections (including the common cold).

    Provide the right hand-washing provisions

    In a recent survey (by Initial, November 2019), one in five workers said that their employers failed to provide hand-washing products such as soap or towels.

    While it can be argued that the responsibility for clean hands lies with the individual, making it easy and providing good products and educating people about efficient hand hygiene is the first very basic step which every employer should be following.

    It is important, however, to ensure you are providing the right products.

    These anti-bacterial wipes, for example have been tested and found effective in working against coronavirus.

     

    SANISAFE ANTI-VIRAL ANTI-BACTERIAL WIPES, TUB OF 100, £5.40 SANISAFE ANTI-VIRAL ANTI-BACTERIAL WIPES, TUB OF 100, £5.40

     

    Soap and water are the most effective way to wash hands, but only if the person dries their hands effectively too.

    Hand sanitizers are also effective if soap and water is unavailable, but it is best to use alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. You can tell if the sanitizer contains at least 60% alcohol by looking at the product label.

    Sanitizers can quickly reduce the number of germs on hands in many situations. However,

    • Sanitizers do not get rid of all types of germs.
    • Hand sanitizers may not be as effective when hands are visibly dirty or greasy.

    Click here to see our full range of hand-washing products 

    Put up information with hand-washing guidance

    These are the simple steps advised for effective hand-washing:

    • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
    • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
    • Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. As a general guide, hum   Happy Birthday twice.
    • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
    • Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

    You can also download free posters from the World Health Organisation here: www.who.int/gpsc/5may/resources/posters/en/

    How to use hand sanitizer:

    • Apply the gel product to the palm of one hand (read the label to learn the correct amount).
    • Rub your hands together.
    • Rub the gel over all the surfaces of your hands and fingers until your hands are dry. This should take around 20 seconds.

     

    When to wash your hands:

    • As soon as you get home or into work
    • When you blow your nose, sneeze or cough
    • When you eat or handle food
    • Before you touch your eyes, nose and mouth

    Ensure surfaces and desks are cleaned regularly
    Because it's a new illness, experts are still not certain how Covid-19, the new variation of coronavirus spreads from person to person, but similar viruses spread by cough or sneeze droplets. These droplets fall on people in the vicinity and can be directly inhaled or picked up from a contaminated surface on the hands and transferred when someone touches their face.

    Under most circumstances, the amount of infectious virus on any contaminated surfaces is likely to have decreased significantly by 24 hours, and even more so by 48 hours.

    Cleaning of visibly dirty surfaces followed by disinfection is a best practice measure for prevention of COVID-19 and other viral respiratory illnesses. Use detergent and water to clean visible dirt and the US Center for Disease Control recommends then using a disinfectant or cleaning product with at least 70% alcohol

    Special care should be made to clean areas where someone who has cold and flu like symptoms has been working, and all potentially contaminated high-contact areas such as toilets, door handles and telephones.

    We have a range of cleaning and sanitizing products available for workplaces, including ones specially tested against coronavirus such as this disinfectant AX Ultra.

    AX ULTRA VIRUCIDAL/BACTERICIDAL DISINFECTANT, 750ML, £2.73 AX ULTRA VIRUCIDAL/BACTERICIDAL DISINFECTANT, 750ML, £2.73


    AX Ultra is a proven virucidal/bactericidal disinfectant which is safe to use on all touch surfaces that are washable. Use daily to maintain clean and hygienic conditions.Virucidal activity against all enveloped viruses including Coronavirus, Influenza and HIV. Certified to BSEN 1276 and BSEN 14476. Chlorine free.

    Check your cleaning and safeguarding healthcare policies and send your staff updates
    Now is also a good time to look at our policies regarding cleaning, not just of office surfaces, but also PPE equipment and items which will be used and shared by multiple members of staff. Training should include when to use PPE, what PPE is necessary, how to properly don (put on), use, and doff (take off) PPE, and how to properly launder and dispose of PPE.

    When it comes to providing PPE, face masks play a very important role in clinical settings, such as hospitals but there’s very little evidence of widespread benefit from their use outside of these clinical settings. Face masks must be worn correctly, changed frequently, removed properly and disposed of safely in order to be effective.

    Employers should educate staff and workers performing cleaning, laundry, and trash pick-up activities to recognize the symptoms of COVID-19 and provide instructions to all staff on what to do if they develop symptoms within 14 days after their last possible exposure to the virus. At a minimum, any staff should immediately notify their employer and call 111 if they develop symptoms of COVID-19.

    Avoid unnecessary meetings
    Many people can phone in or use video conferencing links rather than being physically present for meetings. It’s worth considering this as an option, and it is one which might in the longer term prove a useful way to save your organisation time and expenses.

    You can find more advice for employers and businesses here: www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-to-employers-and-businesses-about-covid-19/guidance-for-employers-and-businesses-on-covid-19

    Meanwhile if you would like to find out more about which products will suit your needs, or enquire about stock levels on high demand products, please call us on 01726 74264 or email sales@cisafety.com for free advice.

     

  • Packaging: Sustainable options that will save you money

    Fast Food Packaging From Eco Friendly Paper And Recycled Cardboa

    Many businesses are recognising the part they have to play in working towards a more sustainable future. Many are also discovering that as well as communicating ethical values to customers, sustainable packaging options can also help to cut costs.

    Product packaging is a valuable platform to share information and promote your brand. Choosing sustainable materials can also communicate environmental sensibilities, and with more and more consumers actively seeking out companies with eco friendly ethics, more and more options are becoming available. More good news is that some of these options can save you money.

     

    How much packaging do you need?

    Most businesses begin choosing sustainable packaging materials without considering how much packaging is actually needed. As a first step, consider the amount of materials used in your packaging and whether these are actually really needed to ensure products arrive undamaged. Perhaps you can switch from boxes to biodegradable polyolefin shrink wrap which is made from 100% recyclable materials and generally low cost in comparison to similar options. Or, you might try making the packaging for all of your products a uniform size in order to cut down on waste. Some food manufacturers, for example, have started to cut down on the size of their boxes. They still offer the same volume of product, but where they might once have made larger boxes to attract more attention they are now cutting down on the size and notifying customers that they have done this to help protect the environment. It is also, of course, an immediate way to save on the cost of packaging.

    Reusable packaging

    Many companies are finding ways to make their packaging reusable. If you’re a B2B supplier, you could offer discounts for returning crates or reusable bags. If products are going out to consumers, you can use reusable packaging to improve brand awareness. For example, Puma now pack their trainers in bags instead of boxes, meaning that consumers get a tote bag branded with their logo that they can use again and again rather than discarding the packaging.

    Sustainable materials

    Switching to recycled paper or plastic packing options is one option. Another is making use of excess waste offcuts, such as our paper offcuts below.  As well as being more sustainable, making use of waste materials also makes your organisation more efficient. If products need cushioning to avoid damage, styrofoam has been a standard loose-fill packaging. This material, however, tends to break down into micro plastics, entering marine ecosystems and even the human food chain. For businesses looking for an alternative, biodegradable air peanuts are now available to replace them.

     

    WHITE NEWS OFFCUTS, 375 X 500MM 12.5KG, £19.91 WHITE NEWS OFFCUTS, 375 X 500MM 12.5KG, £19.91

    White news offcuts, £19.91

    Click here for an article on more sustainable packaging options.

     

    Labelling

    There are times when printed labels are important, but thinking, quite literally, outside the box when it comes to labelling can help you find some solutions which will also cut costs. Using markers such as our omnigraph crayons rather than printed labels, for example, will mean that you can use recycled boxes, crates or even glass for shipping. This also saves on printer ink and the paper and electrical energy needed to run the printer.

     

    LUMOCOLOR PERM OMNIGRAPH CRAYON, BLACK PK12, £12.40 LUMOCOLOR PERM OMNIGRAPH CRAYON, BLACK PK12, £12.40

     

    We can offer a number of packaging solutions, so if you’re interested in ways that we can help you to be more sustainable and save money, please call us on 01726 74264 or email sales@cisafety.com for a free consultation.

     

  • Keeping your computer clean

    young business man cleaning computer on dark background

    In February a range of organisations run clean your computer campaigns, but why is this important and how do you keep your computer clean? Our guide can help you to improve productivity and save money...
    Cleaning your computer regularly will help you keep it working properly and avoid expensive repairs.

    The keyboard
    It’s easy for dust, crumbs and liquid to end up on a computer keyboard. If these elements get stuck under the keys, they can stop the keyboard from working properly.

    To clean your keyboard, take the following steps:
    1. Ensure your computer is shut down and if necessary, unplug the keyboard.
    2. Turn the keyboard upside down and gently shake it to let dust or crumbs etc fall out.
    3. Use a can of compressed air to clean between the keys.
    4. Use a special computer wipe or moisten a cotton cloth or paper towel with rubbing alcohol and clean the keys. Don’t put any liquid directly onto the keyboard.
    5. Use a cotton bud with the wipe or rubbing alcohol to gently wipe the areas around the keys.
    6. Use a dry wipe or cloth to dry the keyboard.
    7. When the keyboard is dry, reconnect the keyboard if necessary.

    The mouse
    There are two main mouse types: optical mice which use light (LEDs) to track movement and mechanical mice which have small balls which roll over the surface on which you move the mouse.

    Optical mice require no internal cleaning because they do not contain any rotating parts; however, they can stop working well if dust or dirt collects near the light emitter.
    Mechanical mice are especially susceptible to dust and particles that can accumulate inside the rotating ball inside the mouse. This can stop the mouse pointer from working smoothly.

    To clean your mouse:
    1. Unplug the mouse if it is not wireless.
    2. Use a computer cleaning wipe or moisten a cotton cloth with rubbing alcohol, and
    use it to clean the top and bottom of the mouse.
    3. If you have a mechanical mouse, remove the tracking ball by turning the ball-cover
    ring counter-clockwise. Then clean the tracking ball and the inside of the mouse.
    4. Use a dry cloth or allow the mouse to dry before reconnecting the mouse.

    The mousepad
    Wipe your mousepad clean with a damp cloth, using water and a small amount of mild detergent. Allow to air dry.

    The monitor
    Dirt, grease from fingers and dust can make your computer screen difficult to read.
    There are monitor-cleaning kits you can buy, but make sure you use the right kind of cleaner for the material your screen is made from. For example, some cleaning agents will work for glass screens but are not suited to LCD screens. The safest method is simply to use a soft clean cloth moistened with water.
    Avoid using glass cleaning agents as many screens have anti-glare coatings that can be damaged by glass cleaner.

    1. Shut down your computer or laptop.
    2. Unplug the monitor if it has a separate power source.
    3. Use a soft clean cloth moistened with water to wipe the screen clean.
    Do not spray any liquids directly onto the screen.

    Other computer surfaces
    Schedule time once a month to clean your computer case and the sides and back of the monitor to avoid a buildup of dust and dirt.
    ● Use an anti-static cloth to dust your computer casing. Do not use furniture cleaners or solvents.
    ● Use a can of compressed air to blow out debris from the air intake slots.
    ● Clean the monitor housing and case with a computer wipe or slightly damp cloth which you wipe downwards. Gently rub dry with a cloth or wipe afterwards.

    Dealing with spills
    If you spill liquid on the keyboard, quickly shut down the computer and disconnect the keyboard. Then turn the keyboard upside down and allow the liquid to drain.

    If the liquid is sticky, you will need to hold the keyboard on its side under running water to rinse away the sticky liquid. Then turn the keyboard upside down to drain for two days before reconnecting it. Please note that keyboard may not be fixable at this point, but the method above is probably the best option. To prevent this situation altogether, we recommend keeping drinks away from the computer area.

    Allow air circulation around your computer
    A computer can generate a lot of heat, so the casing has fans that keep it from overheating and it is important to allow good airflow around the device for this reason. Avoid stacking papers, books, and other items around your computer.

    If your computer is enclosed in a compartment or cupboard, make sure it is not pushed close to the sides and leave a door or panel open if possible to ensure good airflow.

    Helpful products

    TELEPHONE & VDU WIPES, £2.86 TELEPHONE & VDU WIPES, £2.86

    Multi- purpose wipes targeted for office use and are ideal for cleaning keyboards/ computer screens etc.

    MICROFIBRE CLOTHS, 40CM SQ RED, £8.32 MICROFIBRE CLOTHS, 40CM SQ , £8.32
  • What do you need to do to prepare for Brexit day?

    Brexit image

    Brexit will be upon us soon, but how will it affect your business and what tasks need to be tackled before and during the transition period? Here is a guide to some of the key things to be aware of:

    HEALTH AND SAFETY

    Health and safety laws will remain largely the same...

    Under the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, all EU law in existence immediately before Brexit is converted straight into UK law as soon as Brexit occurs. These laws have to be interpreted in line with the principles laid down in the European Court as they apply immediately before Brexit day. That means most courts in the UK will be bound by these principles with the exception of the Supreme Court.

    UK courts don’t have to follow any decisions made by the European Court after Brexit, but they may still be taken into account if the UK court considers them to be relevant to a particular case in hand.

    In addition to this  the Health & Safety at Work Act (1974) came into effect before the UK joined the European Union. It’s a robust and long-lasting piece of legislation which demonstrates the UK’s commitment to ensuring the safety of workers.

    In addition, most employment laws affecting workers rights are likely to remain the same too as many originated in the UK.

    You can find more information on how HSE regulations will operate should a no deal Brexit occur here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/health-and-safety-executive-information-if-the-uk-leaves-the-eu-without-a-deal

    SAFETY MARKS

    In most cases, you can continue to use the CE safety mark

    According to government advice, “In the majority of cases you will still be able to use the CE marking if you are selling goods on the UK market after the UK leaves the EU.” Goods on sale in the UK before Brexit takes place will be considered “placed on the market” and can continue to be sold without any changes.

    However, once Brexit takes place, the process of replacing the CE mark with the UK Conformity Assessed (UKCA) mark will begin.

    The government will give businesses notice about the change to using UKCA markings, and importantly, the rules for using them will be very similar to the current rules for using CE markings. One key point is that the UKCA marking will not be recognised in the EU market.

    Meanwhile, most PPE suppliers in the UK will still be able to use the CE marking for products being placed on the UK market if any of the following apply:

    • you currently CE mark your good on the basis of self-certification
    • any mandatory third-party conformity assessment was carried out by an EU-recognised notified body
    • the certificate of conformity previously held by a UK body has been transferred to an EU-recognised notified body

    If PPE is CE compliant, it will continue to be compliant in the UK.

    For more detailed advice and guidance on the CE  and UKCA mark click here:
    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/prepare-to-use-the-ukca-mark-after-brexit

    LABELLING

    Food and drink

    Companies which label food and drink will need to make changes to their labelling.

    Although the UK will have a 21-month transition period for labelling changes after exit day, there are some instances where a transition period is not possible. The main examples of this are:

    • the use of the EU organic logo,
    • use of the EU emblem
    • labelling food as originating in the ‘EU’

    Defra is encouraging a pragmatic approach to enforcement of these rules within the UK.

    For more guidance on labelling food and drink click here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/food-labelling-changes-after-brexit

    For advice specific to organic food, click here:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/trading-and-labelling-organic-food-if-theres-no-brexit-deal

    You can also find general guidance if your business is in the food and drink sector here:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-food-and-drink-sector-and-preparing-for-eu-exit

    Textiles

    The rules for labelling textiles will largely remain the same should a no deal Brexit occur:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/textile-labelling-after-brexit

     

    USING CHEMICALS

    If you’re using, making, selling or importing chemicals in the EU, you need to follow REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of Chemicals) regulations.

    Find out what you must do to meet REACH requirements.

    For more information, click here:

    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/how-to-comply-with-reach-chemical-regulations

     

    DATA PROTECTION

    If your company is GDPR compliant and you have no contacts or customers in the European Economic Area (EEA), then you do not need to prepare to be data compliant if a no deal Brexit happens. If you do have contacts and customers, or a presence in the EEA, you will need to take steps. Mainly, this will involve working on your Standard Contractual Clauses.

    The Information Commissioners Office has full guidance and some helpful toolkits here: https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/data-protection-and-brexit/data-protection-and-brexit-for-small-organisations/

     

    TRADE MARKS AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

    There have been some changes to intellectual property laws to try to help protect UK businesses in advance of Brexit. After Brexit, however EU Trade Marks (EUTMs) will no longer protect trade marks in the UK. On exit day, the IPO will create a comparable UK trade mark for all right holders with an existing EU trade mark.

     

    For more information and help on trade marks, copyright, patents and design click here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/intellectual-property-and-brexit

     

    FURTHER GUIDANCE

    These are some of the key points which our customers and contacts will need to be aware of.  If you are looking for more advice, you can find a helpful list of advice by topic at this link on the governments Brexit advice website: https://www.gov.uk/find-eu-exit-guidance-business

     

    Of course our team are also happy to talk to you about how we can help to make sure you are ready for a no deal Brexit. Call us on 01726 74264 or email sales@cisafety.com if you would like a free consultation.

  • 5 New Year safety resolutions every business should make

    Safety at work. Conceptual hand writing showing Work Safety. Business photo text policies and procedures in place to ensure health of employees Female human wear formal work suit presenting smart device.

    When it comes to safety in the workplace we often tend to focus on what we are doing wrong or ticking the boxes to ensure we are compliant and meet regulations. Of course we all want workplaces to be safe to ensure no-one is harmed or injured unnecessarily, but building good health and safety practices into the workplace culture will also help to improve efficiency and morale as well as benefiting productivity profit margins.

    We have selected 5 effective safety resolutions you can adopt which will result in better health and safety in your workplace as 2020 gets underway.

    Have a weekly tidy up
    A tidy and well-organized workplace improves safety by ensuring that trip hazards are removed and that important safety equipment such as PPE and first aid kits are kept in a location where staff can find them quickly and easily. The regular maintenance through weekly tidying ensures that the drift of misplaced items and general untidiness is habitually kept in check. It also improves productivity, saving the average two to three hours per week which the average worker spends looking for lost things. Studies reveal that a tidy workplace generally reduces stress in workers and ensures that anyone who visits the workplace feels a sense that things are running smoothly and efficiently. You can find out more about the productivity and stress-reducing benefits of a tidy workplace in this article: The case for finally cleaning your desk.

    Encourage staff to wash their hands
    It sounds unimportant, but improving basic hygiene standards by providing hand sanitizers, training and signage to encourage your workforce to wash their hands regularly can dramatically reduce the time staff are unwell. According to a 2014 study, a virus sample placed on a doorknob and tabletops in an office spread to 40-60 percent of workers and visitors within just 2-4 hours. As well as reducing sick leave, it can also mean fewer accidents which occur due to staff members who have turned up for work not feeling alert and at their best because they are poorly.

    Plan monthly PPE spot checks
    A very common cause of incidents is the mis-wearing or mis-use of PPE equipment. A survey released by Kimberly-Clark Professional, revealed that 89 percent of safety professionals said they had observed workers not wearing safety equipment when they should have been and 29 percent said this had happened on numerous occasions. At the start of each year, it is a good idea to organise refresher training and handouts to remind staff of key things to remember when it comes to wearing PPE. Spot checks can also help to identify issues such as loose-fitting items, worn straps or items being worn incorrectly. The spot checks will also reveal if PPE is not fit for purpose because it is uncomfortable or not working as it should and opens up channels of communication between management and staff using the PPE for reporting other safety issues that concern them.

    Have a session to refresh and discuss lifting and carrying techniques
    Another highly common cause of injuries and indeed legal action in the workplace are incidents which happen when workers are lifting or carrying heavy objects,. Figures from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) show that musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the biggest risk to British workers with more than a million cases reported each year, at a cost more than £5.7 billion. At this time of year, hold or plan in a refresher session for staff to make sure they are aware or have been reminded of the proper techniques to lift or carry heavy objects. Also, include the storage of heavy objects, checking that all staff understand the importance of placing heavy boxes and items in the correct places around the workplace. You can also use these sessions to ask staff if they have any concerns or requests around other safety issues.

    Send short and sweet safety updates throughout the year
    Regular fire drills are required by law (click here for UK regulations on fire drills), but it's also a good idea to involve workplace first aiders and staff in quarterly dummy runs or refreshers of other incidents. These can be drills based on what needs to happen if a minor injury occurs, to what someone needs to do if they believe a hazardous chemical has been spilled. Ensuring that you include a health and safety article in a regular workplace newsletter or bulletin can be a habitual way to remind all staff of key information such as where the first aid box is, or who the current first aiders are and break down key health and safety information into bite-sized, digestible portions, rather than assuming staff will read lengthy policy documents and remember all the information. The article below also suggests ways in which you can introduce training techniques to help ensure workers don’t forget safety training, but actively get into good habits which ensure workplace safety: Why do employees forget their training.

    Of course it is always a good idea to make sure you review your safety procedures and equipment and our team are always happy to help and suggest options that would suit your business needs. Call us on 01726 74264 or email sales@cisafety.com if you would like a free consultation.

  • How to take care of your hygiene tools

     

    Cleaning Products With Cleaning Material, Isolated On White

    Once you’ve chosen the right hygiene tools for your business taking time to make sure they are used, cleaned and stored properly will not only prolong their life and maintain their quality and effectiveness but will help to ensure that you meet required health and safety regulations. Here’s our guide:

     

    Keeping it clean

    You might think that this goes without saying, but it’s always worth mentioning that a hygiene tool is only as good as its cleanliness. There are six main steps when cleaning your tools. Start with a  pre-clean during which you remove excess food waste by knocking, wiping or pre-rinsing the tool. Then, during the main clean, loosen surface waste and grease with a detergent. After this, rinse to remove loose food waste, grease and detergent. While this might seem like a good place to stop, you must now follow with a disinfectant or heat to kill bacteria before completing a final rinse to remove the disinfectant. Once this is all complete, you must let your hygiene tools dry completely, ideally through air drying, but paper towels or clean, dry cloths can also be used. Instilling these practices during training, policies and visible materials to remind staff of cleaning procedures will not only ensure that health and hygiene standards are maintained, but your tools will last longer and work more effectively.

     

    Keep to a schedule

    To ensure your tools are being cleaned consistently and to the correct standards, it might be beneficial to create a cleaning schedule and guidelines so that everyone knows what needs to be cleaned, how often and when they need to be cleaned and by who. Of course, instigating a ‘clean as you go’ ethic is also a good practice for any tools that are used regularly or which come into contact with food. Having a weekly, monthly or quarterly intensive clean can also be a good back up, particularly for items which may be forgotten or used infrequently.

     

    Read the instructions 

    It can be easy to lapse into a groove and assume all products can be cleaned the same way and with the same chemicals. Make sure staff read any instructions and labels before cleaning as some materials will be affected by certain chemicals and avoiding these chemicals will help to preserve your tools. This is particularly important for hygiene tools which come into contact with food as the plastic or polymers can be damaged by inappropriate cleaning techniques which in turn can cause a breach in health and hygiene standards.

     

    Store items correctly 

    Putting particular thought into how you store your tools might not be a priority but it’s worth noting that if you don’t store cleaning equipment in a hygienic manner it can result in a non-compliance according to the food safety standards set out by BRCGS (BRCv8: 4.11.6 – ‘Cleaning equipment shall be cleaned and stored in a hygienic manner’). For example, if you have colour coded hygiene tools, it is important to store each tool with tools of the same colour to avoid cross-contamination. When exploring storage solutions, keep in mind units that are designed to increase cleaning efficiency and reduce hygiene tool and cross-contamination.

     

    Click here to see information about Vikan Shadow Boards Click here to see information about Vikan Shadow Boards

     

    Some of our suppliers, including Vikan have storage equipment such as wall brackets, shadow boards and colour-coded brackets that can help you to implement effective storage solutions.

     

    It’s also helpful, when designing your cleaning procedures, ensure your storage accommodates only the tools required for cleaning each specific area of your site.

    If you would like more information about this, our sales team are happy to help and suggest options that would suit your business needs. Call us on 01726 74264 or email sales@cisafety.com

Buyer, Cornwall Glass Group
Shortly after Cornwall Glass was formed some 15 years ago I started dealing with yourselves as a Supplier I don't believe in all those years whatever I have asked for - however obscure! you have never let me down - I'd like to think that we have quite a unique relationship thank you very much
Site Manager, International Minerals company
Special note - Amelia has done a great job this year for our site, quick, efficient, good follow-up and courteous, everything you need at the customer interface.
Purchasing, Food Manufacturer
After our BRC audit we received grade : A . I`m really happy, thank you for you and all the CIS team for your help.
Manager, Food wholesaler

You are amazing!!!!

Technical Manager, Seafood
A very good local company delivering a prompt and informative service. Excellent!
Health & Safety Manager, Waste Cleansing & Drain Clearing co
A company that always performs to the word "quality", helpful with innovations in PPE, guidance and support. A company that is a valuable asset to us as a supplier.

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